Connect with us

Fashion

Sinn Féin disputes claim united Ireland would cost €20bn over 20 years

Published

on

Sinn Féin has disputed the methodology of a report which suggested that a united Ireland would cost the Republic €20bn for the next 20 years.

The report, from the Institute of International and European Affairs (IIEA), revealed that the reunification of Northern Ireland and the Republic would require an increase in taxation and a significant reduction in public expenditure.

The report was authored by the IIEA’s John FitzGerald of Trinity College Dublin and Prof Edgar Morgenroth of Dublin City University.

The report said the cost to the British government of running Northern Ireland amounts to €12.3bn a year.

The costs are based on pre-pandemic 2019 figures.

The report stated that the unifications costs minus the UK treasury subvention would run to around €11bn.

But this figure would rise to €20bn when others factors, including social welfare and public service pay, are included.

This would require an increase in taxation and a significant reduction in public expenditure.

Sinn Féin whip Pádraig Mac Lochlainn said that he disputed the methodology used in the report.

The Donegal TD claimed that the analysis was static.

“You are accepting the amount of subvention on face value,” he added.

We know that there is a real opportunity in that thanks to the efforts of all the political parties and people on the island of Ireland.

“Prof John Doyle of DCU in recent times has written that the actual subvention is much less.

“It’s about 2.4 billion.

“That’s a quarter when you deduct the pensions, debt repayments, contribution to the defence forces of Britain and so on.

“It’s much less than the headline figure.

“But also the report assumes there will be no economic growth in the north.

“We know that since Brexit there has been substantial growth in the all-Ireland economy.

“We know that there is a real opportunity in that thanks to the efforts of all the political parties and people on the island of Ireland.

“That means that the people of the north have access to the British economy and to the European economy uniquely, there is real opportunity for economic growth.

“I do praise them (Prof FitzGerald and Prof Morgenroth) for doing some type of research, some type of planning and analysis, which is very different in own government who has no plan whatsoever to look at how we get to Irish unity.”

Mr Mac Lochlainn called for a Citizien’s Assembly and a White Paper from the Government about the issues arising from reunification.

Continue Reading